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. the gentlelady from new york. ms. slaughter: mr. speaker, i'm pleased to yield three minutes to the gentleman from south carolina, the assistant democrat leader, mr. clyburn. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from south carolina is recognized for three minutes. mr. clyburn: thank you, mr. speaker. i request permission to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. clyburn: i thank the gentlelady for yielding me this time. mr. speaker, when the so-called supercommittee failed last year to overcome the obstruction of the tea party republicans and their leader, grover norquist, to achieve a fair and balanced plan for deficit reduction, economic growth, and job creation it would take a decisive national election to settle the matter. i believe president obama's victory on november 6 was very decisive and pretty definitive. during the campaign president obama very clearly laid out his vision and the american people strongly affirmed his position. the president won all but one of the swing states. 62% of the electoral college, and carried the popular vote by more than 4.
to the rule, the gentlewoman from florida, ms. ros-lehtinen, and the gentleman from new york, mr. engel, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from florida. ms. ros-lehtinen: i thank the speaker, and i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and to insert extraneous materials into the record on this measure. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. ros-lehtinen: i thank the speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for as much time as she wishes to consume. ms. ros-lehtinen: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of house resolution 134, introduced by my good friend and colleague from illinois, mr. dold. house resolution 134 condemns the iranian regime's persecution of iran's baha'i minority. baha'i are the largest non-muslim population in iran, numbering over 300,000 members in iran alone. mr. speaker, this resolution marks the 12th congressional action urging the iranian regime to end its persecution of the baha
good friend from rochester new york, the distinguished ranking minority member of the committee on rules, ms. slaughter. pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. dreier: all time will be yielded for debate purposes only. i would like to ask, mr. speaker, unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks on this resolution. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. dreier: mr. speaker, i was just thinking about the fact that there are 26 letters in the alphabet, and we have had the first three letters used in discussion here on the house floor today. a, b, and my friend from worcester brought up the letter c in talking about this. we have what is so-called letter b. and i'm not doing a "sesame street" skit here. letter b is what we are talking about, plan b, and i think about plan a. plan a is what the majority in the house of representatives has been trying for the last two years to implement
don't realize, there are many more to be licensees that other people realize. in new york, where i am, the number is 28. there was a large allocation of these licenses before cable and satellite and what we're doing now, and this is the -- i think innovation of auctions, how can we use market mechanisms to reallocate some of that spectrum to mobile broadband in a win-win way? and that is what we're doing. that is why there will be brauferts who remain in new york and -- broadcasters who remain in new york and others. there is tremendous opportunity to free up spectrum to promote innovation. >> when we moved over the 200 megahertz in 2003, we had a two-star general who said it's absolutely technologically impossible to do. so again, do you have a process that's totally fair to the broadcasters and to the wireless industry that's in place? have you had them in your office simultaneously with their engineers to talk about the issues so that you can hear and your experts can hear the differences which they have? >> that's exactly what we're doing. through the notice and comment process, t
about it on the cover of the "new york times" today, a month ago is when she began talking about it. we have the publisher and author of a best seller called "secrets to winning a scholarship." next to him, an attorney with the national consumer law center and the author of several publications including "student loan lot," and "the guide to surviving student debt." next to her is the n.y.u. chief enrollment officer. he is in charge of the office of financial aid. so, to get into the solutions oriented discussion we're going to have today, the problem is something i think everybody is very familiar with, but i think of the saleogle's is an interesting harbinger. if you type in student loan, it will suggest student loan forgiveness. if you type in student debt, it will suggest student debt crisis. this is a problem many people worry about, whether it is at 3:00 a.m. when they cannot sleep or in the hospital staring at their new baby and wondering, how will i do this the way i want to, the way maybe my parents were able to manage in a previous generation. the average student graduates wit
had the housing crisis. host: wanda in new york. caller: good morning. thank you for taking my call. we have a home in new york. i do not see prices rising in my area. we have a home in florida in a new development that we bought in 2006. our interest rate is 6.5%. we are unable to refinance and severely under water. maybe half of the homes are sold. the rest are for clothes. -- are foreclosed upon. we do not have a fannie or freddie mortgage. what is there for us? it just seems clear on this treadmill and we cannot seem to get ahead. do you see there is a potential for us going forward in helping people with that second home that is severely underwater with a 6.5% interest rate? guest: the mortgage availability for second homes. not be part of dodd-frank was limiting mortgage availability for second homes. the difficulty of getting the mortgages for second homes and the over stringent in getting a mortgage. during the downturn, second home mortgages are a great -- they are a great help in the overall recovery. they are not participating other than all cash buyers. the all cash buye
. nothing to stop the epidemic of senseless gun violence that plague not only our major cities like new york and chicago, but countless small towns throughout our nation, towns with names like newtown, aurora, tucson, dekalb, blacksburg and littleton. in the years i have been a member of this body, this house has not held a single hearing, not one to address gun violence. while over 30,000 americans die each year from gun violence, over 400 lives have been lost by gun violence in my hometown of chicago, people are dying every day. . we in this body are afraid to talk about it. the time has come for us to stop listening to the gun lobby and start listening to the american people. the fact is the majority of americans gun owning and not, desire commonsense, reasonable gun regulation. congress must no longer stand in the way of reasonable legislation, instead we must champion it. the american people want to see background checks required on all firearm purchases instead of the fractions of sales that get done today. 408% of u.s. gun sales are by private sellers who are not required to perform b
new york, the bipartisan safer act, companion bill with the bipartisan bill in the senate by senator cornyn and senator bennett. the safer act does a lot of good things but basically it allows funding to go and -- so that we make sure we test these cases. it audits these backlogs so we know where these cases are that are sitting on the shelves. it does the audit. it brings funding and brings these cases to justice so that we can make sure that these victims of crime have their day in court as well. d.n.a. is a wonderful thing, and it's important that we make sure that evidence is available for law enforcement, for prosecutors and judges in the courtroom. she was a child, lavenia was a child when she was sexually assaulted. that was a long time ago, but there are 400,000 cases waiting to be tested. this is something we can do in a bipartisan way today to test those cases, to bring justice to the victims of crime and make sure those outlaws get their day in court as well and be held accountable for the rape of children in our country. and that's just the way it is. i yield back. the sp
columnist. he is with us from new york. yesterday, we spoke about the normalcy of the stock market but today reaction to what happened in washington with stocks tumbling, down more than 120 points. michael, thank you for being with us yet again. what are you looking at, here in washington, what our financial experts telling you? guest: the maneuvers yesterday, the failure to bring the boat disturbed a little bit of an overly comfortable consensus here in washington that a deal was pretty much in the bag. i think we are now having to yesterday, the failure toreconcile the newh is nothing likely to happen today. obviously, you want to hear what the speaker has to say. but right now, the market is hopeful that it gets at least what i would call a small bargain. i think that would be enough to satisfy financial types. let alone a very big picture budget questions that seemingly have been on and off the table variously for the past few weeks. host: "the wall street journal" in an editorial suggesting extending reality, which all tax cuts for the six months to give congress time to work out an agr
unemployment extended benefits, versus new york, which has the highest level of weeks allowed right now because of their differing unemployment rates. guest: it is administered by states. i think a lot of the state programs are too restrictive in their eligibility and have to look capps. there are some important steps forward in the american recovery act -- too low caps. there are some important steps forward and the american recovery act. i do not see a lot of prospects for much greater federal involvement any time soon. host: mableton, illinois on the line for independents. caller: i want to direct this to mr. tanner. i have never been in debt. i have a retirement, have a very nice pension from the state of california bar when i was a state police officer. -- for when i was a state police officer. we're not putting enough emphasis on what has happened in the last 10 years, seven trillion dollars t 6o de dollars trillion and we lost in pensions. --7 dollars trillion to $60 trillion that we lost in pensions. what would you do? how long do you think it should take to get out of this mess that th
and the big states, new york, california, and illinois, would have to much influence of a think there is a balance. others think that sent the candidates primarily go to these battleground states where it is too close to call to make up the 270 electoral college votes, that the other states get ignored and it suppresses turnout of therefore it is not good for democracy. so, there have been many amendments over the years. not many recently. they stopped in 1979. there was only one attempted to build this last session, 113th congress, did not go anywhere. many amendments attempted -- many states have innovations which we can talk about later if you like. to change the way they count the votes. host: let's go to the phones and go to casey from atlanta, georgia. caller: good morning. and good morning to your guest. guest: good morning. caller: i believe that this conversation is so enlightening and informative. professor thurber can certainly -- i believe 1988, in the state of west virginia, there was a democratic elector that was pledged for the democratic nominee, governor dukakis
metropolitan of boston, new york, l.a., and as a consequence of that, it can win elections but it always has difficulty enforcing the elections. it is somewhat ironic that party fell apart because of the slavery crisis. it was responsible for the whole idea of expansion westward and it was the issue of slavery in that territories -- what will the state is in the territories be? it fell apart as a consequence of its fundamental basis of american expansion westward. the whigs and the republicans were more or less opposed to expansion because they saw the expansion of slavery. in 1930 and 1931, republicans in the midst of the depression may have made the economic slump worse by doubling down on the terrace and the gold standard -- to colors of their post civil war policy that proved successful in the past but that were of doubtful at the sea in the new circumstances prevailing after the great war. what do i mean by that? the gold standard and the tariff worked as long as america is an out liar in a european dominated system. this is true all the way up to world war one so that the european powe
think i'm going to new york -- i'm going to new york tomorrow to spend time with some of our members there and seeing the devastation that's occurred. the gentleman and i know is very aware of that. we need a supplemental so we need time to do that. and it's not a very sexy issue but postal reform is again another issue we're talking about balancing. the postal department has not been able to balance its budget, as we know. part of it is dealing with the retirement programs that they're funding. but i'm wondering if the gentleman has any thoughts on any one of those four bills. i'll yield to my friend. mr. cantor: i'll try to be brief. on the farm bill, the gentleman is correct. we will face some very dire consequences if we don't act on the very issue prior to leaving here. part of what i indicated last week is that is something we are focused on and know we have to deal with the issue prior to the end of the year. on the issue of vawa, as the gentleman and i knows, we can't go to the conference with a senate bill. the sflat has a blue slip problem. i am speaking with the president
introduce adam, supreme court correspondent for "the new york times." >> as david said, you guys are in for a treat. you really couldn't ask for a better panel to think through these issues how to balance integrity and access. i'm going to say a word about each of the panelists, their biographical material is available to you. then we'll hear brief presentations from each of them and a more general conversation and save time for your questions at the end. natalie tennant is the secretary of state in west virginia. she's the state's most transparent office holder. i'm literal minded so i half expected a ghost. more seriously she's also had more investigations and convictions for election violations than any other secretary in west virginia's history. maybe later on we can talk about what the data is and what kinds of problems election administrators face. and then hear from ground zero of the 2012 elections is secretary of state of ohio, jon husted, who has had a distinguished career before his current job in the ohio legislature as having served as speaker of the ohio house and a
on september 8, 2001 new york sacramento, california. -- in sacramento, california. >> my name is paul mauser, i'm the father of paul maus -- of daniel mauser who was killed in the massacre at columbine high school. >> my name is paul wilson. my beautiful wife christy lyn wilson, 26 years, was cowardly shot and killed in california, onth 12, 2011. -- october 12, 2011. >> i'm andre, i am father of bear. my son miraculously survived the shooting, he was in the line of fire. i am here not to represent the entire town, i am here just on my own accord. >> obviously the town that andre is talking about is newtown, connecticut. before we begin, is there anybody else here who has a story they want to share? i also come to this issue through personal experience. my younger brother was shot in a shooting that happened on the observation deck of the empire state building and i have some prepared remarks here but before i begin them, i just want to point out today there will be 32 more families that know the pain and horror that you just heard here today. we pay a lot of attention, and appropriately so,
the things the we do here, unemployment, energy problems -- when i get up in the morning, i get "the new york times," and the first place i go is the sports page. for a few minutes every morning, i dream of the athlete that i wanted to be. [laughter] and as i have dreamed over the decades, i thought, wouldn't it be great to be able to meet a babe ruth or lou gehrig? or maybe a rocky marciano? joe frazier? but today, i have been able to meet two of the people i have dreamed about going down to that 18th hole. with a good put, i can win this thing. this is a personal privilege for me to be able to meet the great jack nicklaus and to be here to help honor the great arnold palmer. we know that arnold palmer has played on the finest courses that the world has. he has designed 300 golf courses. seven of them are in nevada, operating now. he has won trophy after trophy after trophy. he has been swinging golf clubs since a little boy of four years old. he was always such a big star. i hope, arnold, you'll remember. you and winnie were traveling across the country. they stopped a long way from las veg
words followed by deeds. with that let me yield to the vice chair-elect, the gentleman from new york, mr. crowley. >> thank you, xavier. many of my colleagues have come to know my family in a personal way. all three of my children were born while i've been a member of congress. i have a little guy by the name of liam. he's 7 years old. and yesterday i learned of a little boy named ben wheeler who loved to ride the seven line, the seven train that goes from times square all the way out to what was once shea stadium, now citifield. i love the seven as well. so do my children. i saw on my face my own little boy and i think that for many of us, whether it be democrat or republican, that has to strike home. it certainly did for me and my family. i think that's what made this particular event, if you can say it's unique, it's unique in that the innocence that was lost on friday was like no other. not to even compare innocence of what happened in aurora to connecticut, but when little children are just taken in that way i think it brings all of us to this table. as john larson has said, inactio
't have virginia or new york, it wouldn't work. so it came about one of the great informal agreements in american legal history, there was an agreement, an informal agreement, that if the constitution were ratified as written bit 1787 convention, that there would be a bill of rights. and the statesmen, and there were statesmen in those days, kept their word so we had a bill of rights in 1791. and the result is we have a hamiltonian structure and jeffersonian bill of rights. and let me mention a few things about each of those. insofar as structure, they are different structures but one of the principal ones is separation of powers and checks and balances. we use those terms often interchangeably, separation of powers and checks and balances but they actually have a different thrust. separation of powers. teaches each brafrpbl of the government has a certain autonomy to act on its own. checks and balances works the other way around. checks and balances indicates the government cannot of course operate unless the branches interact with each other. there's a certain newtonian metaphor to
new york served from 1996-1998 and from 2005 until the present. they will all be retiring from congress at the end of the year. the record will remain open for five business days for any member of the committee who wishes to submit a statement or additional questions. if there is nothing further, we are adjourned. thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> this afternoon at 5:30, we will have a discussion about cycles of political change in the u.s. we will hear from the manhattan institute about how u.s. debt, economic growth, and the retirement of baby boomers could lead to political and economic change. and look at our prime time schedule on the c-span network starting at 8:00 eastern. president obama visiting an auto plant and he will talk about the fiscal cliff and the needs of middle class family. on c-span2, michael powell on the future of television. then a discussion of the iran nuclear program. that is across the sea span networks. on capitol hill, the house returns tomorrow. members w
that because now there was magnetic tape. before that you had to go to fancy, highly capitalized studios in new york or l.a. or chicago. to record. so now the artist you are talking about are able to take advantage to communicate with these new technologies. on the education, can i say, i'm an old-fashioned guy. i still want those kids to come to a seminar on a campus for a while. i do. very much. but i'm also teaching a course next year and i'm trying to figure out how to get my 15-minute chunks looking at a camera and how to integrate that with the courses i teach students at penn. we are early days of this. nobody thinks -- >> a question there. >> carol thompson from strategic consulting. i have a question for each of the three panelists. we have been talking about innovation, education, and we have been talking what we are hoping for the future. i would like to ask you about the future. what are your greatest fears and your greatest hopes for 2016 and, 2020? it's a small question. >> i'm presume you don't think the world is going to end december 21st. . >> you are in a whole different compa
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)